Teaching with an Index Card: The Benefits of Free, Open-Source Tools

Teaching with an Index Card: The Benefits of Free, Open-Source Tools

Every semester, thousands of faculty members create course websites on a learning-management system such as Blackboard or Canvas. Colleges purchase these platforms, which allow professors to post readings, send messages, and facilitate discussions among students. And yet these expensive, proprietary systems are rarely used outside of classrooms. Alternatively, teaching with free, open-source software, including the…

Teaching Through Publishing: Scholarly Journal Article as Collaborative Final Project (a How To Guide)

Teaching Through Publishing: Scholarly Journal Article as Collaborative Final Project (a How To Guide)

On August 30, 2017, three students from my Queens College composition course published an article in the scholarly, peer-reviewed journal Hybrid Pedagogy. Their article, “The Ultimate Life Experience: Preparing Students for the World Beyond the Classroom” argues that colleges ought to prepare students for a great future, and offers concrete suggestions for how teachers, administrators, and students can…

Community Guidelines: Fostering Inclusive Discussions of Difference

Community Guidelines: Fostering Inclusive Discussions of Difference

In this blog, I describe how my class co-authored a set of community guidelines in order to create a supportive environment for discussing issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality. This past semester, I had the deep pleasure of teaching an English course on “The Arts of Dissent” at Queens College, where I shared some…

Final Projects from Students in “The Arts of Dissent” at Queens College

Final Projects from Students in “The Arts of Dissent” at Queens College

This semester students in my ENG 241 course at Queens College took what they learned and co-created their own “arts of dissent”: original websites, videos, timelines, lesson plans, poetry, photography, and drawings. (I’ve included the rationale for this assignment at the bottom of this post.) Want to know what Queens College students think about 2017? They think…

“So what do we do now?” Lessons from the AAC&U 2017 Annual Meeting

“So what do we do now?” Lessons from the AAC&U 2017 Annual Meeting

At whose expense are service learning and diversity courses effective? Can U.S. education policy stop telling poor students what to do (and instead provide them with resources and opportunities)? How can we avoid reproducing oppressions in our social justice work in education? These are just some of the difficult and important questions addressed at this…

Five Principles for a Dynamite Teaching Statement

Five Principles for a Dynamite Teaching Statement

Just because you have never written a statement of your teaching philosophy does not mean you do not have a philosophy. If you engage a group of learners who are your responsibility, then your behavior in designing their learning environment must follow from your philosophical orientation…. What you need to do is discover what [your…

Student-Centered Pedagogy Class Recap

Student-Centered Pedagogy Class Recap

On March 10, 2015, I co-lead a public workshop on student-centered pedagogy with Michelle Gabay and Hallie Scott. Read the full recap here. Mapping the Futures of Higher Education Session Plan – March 10 – Student-Centered Pedagogy 415-615 pm Room 9206; Livestreamed at bit.ly/FuturesED-live A workshop for innovative classroom practices focusing on collaboration, crowdsourcing, and…